Dating other religions

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Neither Judaism nor Christianity is a monolithic religion.

While to an outsider the differences among Jews or among Christians might seem small, they can be significant.

Conversion or reaffiliation for convenience is an insincere act, sometimes for relatively trivial reasons such as a parent converting to enable a child to be admitted to a good school associated with a religion, or a person adopting a religion more in keeping with the social class they aspire to.

When people marry one spouse may convert to the religion of the other.

They found that non-religious participants in particular associated religious behaviour with less openness, and that this inference led them to devalue religious individuals as romantic partners.

In one experiment, religious and non-religious participants decided whether or not they would date forty possible romantic partners who varied in how frequently they attended religious services.

It is not unusual for both Jews and Christians to have misconceptions about each other's religion or to harbor stereotypes.

"Dating" as it is currently practiced in much of the world does not exist among Muslims.

Young Muslim men and women (or boys and girls) do not enter into one-on-one intimate relationships, spending time alone together and "getting to know one another" in a very deep way as a precursor to selecting a marital partner.

Across a number of faiths and cultures, people tend to date and marry others who share their religious beliefs.

Now, new psychology research suggests this phenomenon -- known as 'religious homogamy' -- is partially a result of inferences about religious people's personalities.